Comments

  • Matt Johnson

    The best place to start is the Oracle SCM Cloud Using Global Order Promising documentation. It has a good discussion of these concepts. There's also an Oracle University Order Management and Fulfillment Cloud Implementation course, which includes four GOP-related lessons:

    • Global Order Promising – Introduction and Overview
    • Order Promising Rules
    • Key Order Promising Functionality
    • Data Collection and Global Order Promising Administration

    Finally, there's a whitepaper posted here on Cloud Customer Connect that may help: How Global Order Promising Sources Supply for Your Orders.

  • Matt Johnson

    Global Order Promising is pre-integrated with Supply Planning Cloud, so that you can promise orders in Global Order Promising based upon planned supply. Global Order Promising and Supply Chain Planning Cloud also share some of the same infrastructure - collecting supply and order transaction data to be used as the basis for planning and promising, as well as some shared master data. 

    However, other than having to maintain your configurations independently, or write the integration yourself, there aren't any fundamental restrictions on using 3rd-party planning with Oracle Global Order Promising, or using 3rd party order promising with Supply Chain Planning Cloud. Both solutions provide a full set of CSV file loads, and the necessary extracts to interface with 3rd party systems.

  • Matt Johnson

    First, to clarify, the packaging of Supply Chain Management Cloud services was recently updated. Starting in June 2019, customers who subscribe to Order Management Cloud automatically get Global Order Promising. (Customers who subscribed to these services before June could purchase them separately.)

    Now to your question.... Order Management can run without Global Order Promising, but in that case, you will need another way to check availability of supply and schedule order lines for delivery. Global Order Promising also assigns the supply source for back-to-back orders if you're using that feature.

    Typically, customers who chose not to license Global Order Promising along with Order Management Cloud did so because they had a different order promising solution that they wanted to use, or had simple fixed lead times for all orders that could be hard-coded via an Order Management business rule.

  • Matt Johnson

    Order Management Cloud's order entry screen only provides information about the availability date, not the source that's being promised. However, there are web services (both a REST API called Available Supplies, and a SOAP service called Order Promising) that can provide these details to an external app. 

  • Matt Johnson

    You should not have to refresh/restart GOP Cloud every two minutes, even in a high volume environment. However, you may need to adjust the data you collect as well as some of your inventory management procedures to ensure better alignment of GOP’s supply picture with transactional systems.

    GOP’s job is to assign feasible shipment and delivery dates. It does not schedule at below a daily level of detail, so it assigns demand to a day’s worth of supply. That supply almost always starts with on-hand, but it can include receipt and in-transit quantities, purchase requisitions, PO’s, transfer orders, manufacturing work orders, supplier capacity and even planned orders from a supply plan that are expected for a given day. By including whichever of these supply types are relevant for your business in GOP’s in-memory model, you will avoid “surprising” GOP with new on-hand supply that seems to arrive out of nowhere.

    The same thing applies on the demand side. GOP needs to have visibility to all the demands in order not to have supply suddenly disappear. That means scheduling not only all sales orders, but also internal material transfers through GOP. GOP can schedule expense-based transfers, so you can account for non-sales-oriented consumption of supply.

    That still doesn’t cover 100% of inventory management transactions, of course. There will always be times when balances need to change due to cycle counts or miscellaneous issues. GOP Cloud does offer a “real time update” feature that allows you to update selected supply information without restarting the server. By running that process a few times a day, you can deal with those inevitable adjustments. Any remaining deviations should be small.

  • Matt Johnson

    Your query covers two topics: 1) vendor-owned / consigned inventory, and 2) vendor-managed inventory (VMI).

    Vendor-owned inventory at an enterprise site ("consigned inventory") is already supported in Inventory Management Cloud. Buy-side vendor-managed inventory (where a vendor uses consumption data to determine when to replenish the enterprise, and how much to send) is planned for release within this fiscal year.

    The SCM Cloud VMI solution will be delivered as part of the Supply Chain Collaboration Cloud service, and will support both consigned and unconsigned inventory.

    Sell-side (customer-facing) VMI features are also planned, but further out: beyond the next twelve-month horizon.

  • Matt Johnson

    Yes, if you've licensed Global Order Promising Cloud. Order Management Cloud has no visibility to supply on its own.

  • Matt Johnson

    Joe,

    The EBS 12.1.3 integration covers the synchronization of supply and reference data, but it does not include any sample code to invoke the Order Promising SOAP web service to schedule orders. You can find detailed documentation for that service here.

  • Matt Johnson

    Planning Central Cloud is a prerequisite for Supply Planning Cloud and Demand Management Cloud. S&OP Cloud does not have any prerequisites.

    Matt

  • Matt Johnson

    Try this link: https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/saas/supply-chain-management/r13-update18a/oefsc/toc.htm

    Matt

  • Matt Johnson

    Yes - GOP can promise orders based upon supplies collected from multiple source systems.

  • Matt Johnson

    The ability to select and release alternate resources and components to respond to supply problems with primary components and resources is planned for release next calendar year. However, we expect that this feature will only be available as part of Supply Planning, not Planning Central.

  • Matt Johnson

    Just to clarify, while Planning Central is a prerequisite for both Supply Planning Cloud and Demand Management Cloud, Planning Central is *not* a prerequisite for Sales & Operations Planning Cloud. S&OP Cloud can be purchased standalone.

  • Matt Johnson

    Planning Central Cloud is a prerequisite to Demand Management Cloud and Supply Planning Cloud. So if you license Supply Planning Cloud, you also will require a license for Planning Central Cloud. As a result, the demand forecasting capabilities of Planning Central Cloud are available for any Supply Planning Cloud customer to use.

    Supply Planning Cloud customers only need to license Demand Management Cloud if they want the more advanced statistical forecasting and demand planning capabilities that it provides beyond what Planning Central Cloud offers.

  • Matt Johnson

    Romesh,

    You may have more luck getting an answer by posting in the Order Management forum: https://cloudcustomerconnect.oracle.com/resources/fb0241b9ef/summary